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Research

The body of positive evidence for oregano oil as a major antibiotic has grown considerably and continues to grow. Among 52 plant oils tested, oregano was considered to have “pharmacologic” action against common bugs such as Candida albicans (yeast), E. coli, Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Journal of Applied Microbiology, Vol. 86, June 1999].

British researchers published a report in Journal of Applied Microbiology showing that oregano oil had antibacterial activity against 25 different bacteria [Vol. 88, February 2000]. The findings of a separate Italian clinical study in Phytotherapy Research showed that oil of oregano can treat intestinal parasites [Vol. 14, May 2000].

Researchers at the Department of Food Science at the University of Tennessee reported similar results in the Journal of Food Protection that, among various plant oils, oil of oregano exhibited the greatest antibacterial action against common pathogenic germs such as staph, E. coli and Listeria [Vol. 64, July 2001].

Georgetown University Medical Center’s Dr. Harry G. Preuss, M.D., led a study of oregano oil in 2001, and found that relatively low doses of oregano oil inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus bacteria as effectively as the standard antibiotics streptomycin, penicillin and vancomycin. Staphylococcus bacteria is responsible for a variety of severe infections and is becoming increasingly resistant to many antibiotics.